•  Introduction 
•  Conference Planning and Operations 
•  Conference Overview and Schedule 
•  Collaboration with Colleague Organizations 
•  Conference Program Sources 
•  Presentation Formats 
•  Conference Program Content Development 
•  Special Conference Sessions 
•  Mock Interviews 
•  Career Mentoring Sessions
•  Programmatic Opportunities within Unique Locations 
•  Advertising and Exhibit Options 
•  Registration and Presentation Policies
•  Past and Future National Conference Sites


Introduction

Through its professional activities, The College Music Society gathers, considers, and disseminates ideas on the philosophy and practice of music. CMS creates forums in which individuals working in the various areas of music can interact and communicate. Recognizing the richness of musical diversity and the challenge of balancing the traditions of the past with the possibilities of the future, the members of The College Music Society are united by a dedication to the science of learning and the art of teaching and are engaged in a dialogue that will shape music teaching and learning in the years ahead. Through its professional activities, CMS fosters the continuing education and renewal of college and university music faculty; shares the fruits of music scholarship, research, and creative activity; develops and enhances music instruction; and celebrates the importance of teaching.

Members of The College Music Society have enjoyed an exciting national conference since the inception of this initiative in Boston/Cambridge in 1958. Now, more than sixty years hence, the Society reaffirms the importance of CMS National Conferences for the members of the Society and the field of music in higher education.

Purpose

The purpose of the National Conferences of The College Music Society is to provide the music and higher education community with opportunities to (1) celebrate the art of music making, teaching, and learning; (2) share recent research and scholarship within the disciplinary specializations of music; (3) consider issues of current urgency and importance to musicians working in higher education; and (4) reach out to and share with the general public the resources of the music field. CMS conference programs, formats, and goals never know completion, but evolve continually to meet the emerging needs of the music field.

Goals

Through its National Conferences, CMS accomplishes several important goals including (1) the presentation of accomplishments of the music field, including scholarly work, compositions, and performances; (2) examination of the pedagogies appropriate to the music field, and (3) consideration of issues of current importance to both the music field and the Society itself. These goals are accomplished through panels, presentations, performances, demonstrations, workshops, forums, lightning talks, posters that communicate research through graphic means, and other session formats. Taken together, these sessions present each year the breadth of accomplishment and concern of the music field.

Location

The College Music Society holds, on a rotating schedule, its National Confefrence within the boundaries of each of its nine Regional Chapters once each decade. The tenth year is a "wild card year" and is used as a means of exploring unusual or extraordinary opportunities. The schedule and location possibilities are reviewed by the Board of Directors each fall.

At its Fall 2015 meeting, the Board of Directors adopted the following statement to guide conference site selections in the future:

"Commencing in 2017, The College Music Society will make every effort to hold national conferences in those cities and communities who have clear policies prohibiting discrimination against, or permitting the refusal of service, facilities, accommodations, or goods to, any individual on the basis of race, religion, color, gender, sex, national origin, immigration status, ancestry, LGBTQI2-S status, spousal affiliations, or health or disabilities."

 

Conference Planning and Operations

National Conferences are planned and operated by an appointed Program Committee and members of the CMS Executive Office staff.

The Program Chair

The Chair of the Program Committee is appointed by the President in consultation with the Board of Directors. The Program Chair (1) chairs meetings of the Committee; (2) provides oversight concerning the work of the Committee and its members; (3) guides and assists with developing the conference program, including invited performers and keynote speakers; (4) and serves as liaison with educational institutions, music faculty, and ethnic communities within the region in which the conference is being held.


The Program Committee

The Program Committee consists of the Chair and the subcommittees noted below. Members of the Program Committee are appointed by the President, in consultation with the Program Committee Chair, two years prior to the conference. The CMS staff conference planner serves in an administrative and advisory role but is not a voting member of the Committee.

The Program Committee for the National Conference is responsible for issuing calls for program participation. Under the leadership of its Chair, the Program Committee reviews and considers:

  • any directives for a particular year provided by the Board of Directors;
  • possible themes and formats for the conference;
  • possibilities for experimental or unique offerings;
  • operational or programmatic uniquenesses of various geographic locations;
  • expanded programmatic possibilities and horizons through CMS standard practices; and
  • new, creative possibilities.

The Program Committee evaluates submissions from within the CMS membership and makes all final decisions concerning the conference program.

As representatives of the organization, members of the Program Committee should make every effort to attend the conference they have organized, regardless of whether or not they are presenting on the program. Their on-site assistance in greeting attendees, presiding, managing concerts, and performing other duties when called upon is invaluable.

Members of the National Conference Program Committee, the NAMM/CMS GenNext Program Committee, and the International Conference Program Committee are not eligible to 1) submit proposals for presentation or 2) perform, have their works performed, or present at an event for which they serve on the Program Committee. Subcommittee members of the National Conference Program Committee and International Conference Program Committee are not eligible to submit, or be added as collaborators to, any proposal that will be evaluated by their respective subcommittee; however, such subcommittee members may submit, or be added as collaborators to, proposals that will be evaluated by other subcommittees.

 
Subcommittees of the Program Committee

The purpose of the subcommittees noted below is to enhance the conference experience for all CMS members, especially those working with specific fields of music and within various Society-wide efforts.

Composition Committee – The Composition Committee includes a Chair and at least two persons selected from the membership and appointed by the Chair who represent various compositional styles and approaches. It is also recommended that performers be considered for this committee, as they may offer a unique perspective. Under the leadership of the Composition Chair, the Committee (1) issues the Call(s) for Scores, (2) reviews proposals in response to the Call(s) for Scores, and (3) identifies those compositions that are outstanding and should be programmed. Proposal review is conducted utilizing CMS's online proposal submission system and ensuing recommendations are made via a video conference prior to the winter meeting of the Program Committee to ratify their work. The Chair of the Composition Committee will represent the Committee and report on its behalf during meetings of the Program Committee. As is the case with all program matters, the Program Committee makes the final determination for acceptance/non-acceptance. Following the invitation of composers to the program, the Committee determines the performance order of selected works, and is responsible for the on-site management of these concerts. The Composition Chair will appreciate their additional assistance with greeting composers, managing the stage, moving and setting up equipment, or performing other duties when called upon.

Committee on Music Performance – The Committee on Music Performance includes a Chair and at least two persons selected from the membership and appointed by the Chair who represent various performance styles and approaches to music performance. The Committee seeks to identify outstanding performers for the conference program and to facilitate presentation of those performers on the conference program and within communities in the city and region in which the conference is held. The Committee reviews proposals in response to the Call for Performances & Lecture-Recitals, as well as any other special calls related to performance (e.g., Call for Showcase Performances). Proposal review is conducted utilizing CMS's online proposal submission system and ensuing recommendations are made via a video conference prior to the winter meeting of the Program Committee to ratify their work. The Chair of the Music Performance Committee will represent the Committee and report on its behalf during meetings of the Program Committee. As is the case with all program matters, the Program Committee makes the final determination for acceptance/non-acceptance. In addition, the Committee may propose and develop opportunities for conference attendees to experience live music performances by local musicians/ensembles. The Committee works with the Program Committee Chair and CMS conference planner to shape opportunities for such performances, and is responsible for the on-site management of these events as well.

Committee on Conference Engagement – The Committee on Conference Engagement includes a Chair and at least two persons selected from the membership and appointed by the Chair. The Committee seeks to (a) establish liaison with communities within the city and region in which the conference is held and (b) facilitate presentation of conference program sessions within those communities. The committee reviews submissions from CMS members in response to the Call for Community Engagement and identifies those proposals from individual CMS members that are outstanding and should be programmed. Proposal review is conducted utilizing CMS's online proposal submission system and ensuing recommendations are made via a video conference prior to the winter meeting of the Program Committee to ratify the Committee’s work. The Chair of the Committee on Conference Engagement will represent the Committee and report on its behalf during meetings of the Program Committee. As is the case with all program matters, the Program Committee makes the final determination for acceptance/non-acceptance of proposals.

Committee on CMS Initiatives – The Committee on CMS Initiatives includes a Chair (the current Program Committee Chair) and three members (the Program Committee Chair from the previous year, the ensuing year's Program Committee Chair, and the President of the Society). The Committee on CMS Initiatives seeks to (1) move the dialogue forward on issues of wide applicability and interest to the Society and its members, and (2) support current work and initiatives of the Society's Board of Directors, committees, and advisory councils. The Committee accomplishes the following: (1) reviews proposals submitted in response to the Call for Proposals issued to the Society's Committees and Advisory Councils; and (2) coordinates initiatives from the Board of Directors of the Society for special projects with colleague organizations (e.g., NASM, MTNA, NAfME, professional discipline-specific organizations). The Committee conducts its work through online review and through video conferencing as needed. The Chair will represent the Committee and report on its behalf during meetings of the Program Committee.

Scholarship, Research, & Pedagogy Committee – The Scholarship, Research, & Pedagogy Committee includes a Chair and at least three persons selected from the membership and appointed by the Chair who represent the various disciplines within the music field. Generally, the committee will include those with expertise in scholarship and research, teaching and learning, career development, music technology, music business, and other important areas. The committee reviews submissions from CMS members in response to the Call for Papers & Posters; Call for Lightning Talks; and Call for Interactive Presentations; and identifies those proposals from individual CMS members that are outstanding and should be programmed. Proposal review is conducted utilizing CMS's online proposal submission system and ensuing recommendations are made via a video conference prior to the winter meeting of the Program Committee to ratify their work. The Chair of the Scholarship, Research, & Pedagogy Committee will represent the Committee and report on its behalf during meetings of the Program Committee. As is the case with all program matters, the Program Committee makes the final determination for acceptance/non-acceptance.


The CMS Executive Office Staff

The CMS Executive Office Staff is responsible for operating the conference. Working in collaboration with the Program Committee, the staff provides liaison with conference venues and participants, coordinates meeting space set-up and audio-visual equipment, conducts registration, provides attendees with online travel resources, and manages the conference on site.


Meetings of the Program Committee

The Program Committee meets via videoconference as needed, and meets in person at the conference hotel during the winter prior to the conference (typically late January to early March) to determine the final program. The Program Committee considers proposed program content from all sources; selects and organizes final program content; recruits session and presentation chairs, and provides oversight to conference implementation.


Conference Overview and Schedule

Generally, time on the program is given to members, committees, councils, and initiatives of the Society. Under normal circumstances, appropriate program time is provided to each. The amount of activity and intensity of work by the Society’s members, intitaitives, and entities varies from year to year, and this level of activity is often reflected in the content and number of proposals submitted to the Program Committee. The Program Committee will take action on these proposals in light of the issues of current importance to the music field and time available on the conference program.

The College Music Society has developed a master schedule for its conference, outlined on the Conference Schedule Template spreadsheet. As indicated on the spreadsheet, the following principles are used to organize CMS National Conferences:

  • CMS National Conferences are generally held Thursday through Saturday;
  • Preconference workshops are held on Wednesday;
  • Thursday is generally devoted to opportunities for informal discussion of the concerns of and issues facing the music field through forums, panels, committee reports, plenary sessions, and other appropriate formats;
  • Plenary sessions, including the annual Robert M. Trotter Lecture and CMS-ATMI Technology Lecture, are generally not scheduled on the same day. Some flexibility may be required from year to year depending the desired speaker's or performer's schedule;
  • Plenary sessions, and the annual meeting of the CMS membership, are scheduled as single events at which times there are no other competing sessions scheduled, so that all may participate in these sessions;
  • Friday and Saturday are generally devoted to formal presentations of research, creative activity, and music performance;
  • Several concerts of new music by CMS Composers are held throughout the conference. These may or may not be plenary events depending on available time on the program and availability of presentation space;
  • Performances can be included throughout the program, Thursday through Saturday;
  • Depending on the location of the meeting and the relevant issues being considered at the conference, evenings may be devoted to performances, participatory events, banquets, visits to local points of interest, or other appropriate events that support the conference program;
  • The Annual Meeting of the CMS Membership must be included in the conference schedule per the Society's bylaws.
  • CMS National Conferences close on Saturday evening and no formal program events are scheduled for Sunday.


Collaboration with Colleague Organizations

The College Music Society holds its National Conferences in cooperation with other organizations serving the music field. The Society currently develops joint conferences with the Association for Technology in Music Instruction (ATMI), the National Association of College Wind and Percussion Instructors (NACWPI), and Pi Kappa Lambda (PKL). The Society may also meet on an irregular basis with other music organizations.

Joint conferences are developed at least three years in advance. The conference needs of all organizations are defined in detail and included in the Society’s planning efforts. General conference needs include such items as registration areas, meeting rooms, hotel guest rooms, audio-visual equipment, pianos, rehearsal space, security, storage, transportation, catering and other such considerations normally associated with conference planning and operations.

A formal contract is developed and executed between the Society and the organizations with whom a joint conference is developed.


Conference Program Sources

The Program Committee considers proposed content from the following sources:

From CMS Members

Calls for Scores, Calls for Program Participation, Calls for Performers' Concert(s), Calls for Conference Engagement, and any special Calls are issued by May 15 of the year prior to the conference. These Calls provide the opportunity for members of the Society to submit their work for consideration by the Program Committee. The deadline for receipt of proposals in response to all Calls is the Tuesday after U.S. Thanksgiving in late November of each year, which provides CMS members seven months to develop and submit their work for consideration.

The Program Committee Chair or Committee members wishing to propose presentations concerning personal research, performance, composition, or particular professional interests must submit proposals via this anonymous Call process to insure a fair, peer-reviewed evaluation of all propoals.

From CMS Committees & Advisory Councils

A Call for Proposals is issued by May 15 to committees and advisory councils of the Society. The Call provides the opportunity for the Society's leadership committees to share their work and opportunities with conference attendees. The deadline for receipt of proposals in response to all Calls is the Tuesday after U.S. Thanksgiving in late November of each year, which provides committees and advisory councils  seven months to develop and submit their work for consideration.

From the Board of Directors of the Society

The President and Board of Directors maintain liaison with regional, national, and international music and arts organizations in keeping with the larger strategic initiatives of the Society. The President keeps the Chair of the Program Committee apprised of any initiatives with these organizations that may develop into conference presentation sessions, as well as any initiatives of the Board of Directors that might be featured in the program.

Invitations to the Robert M. Trotter Lecturer and CMS-ATMI Technology Lecturer are extended by the Board of Directors usually one year prior to the conference. Further details may be found under "Special Conference Sessions" below.

The Board of Directors, in consultation with the Society's committees, may extend from time to time additional invitations to accomplished scholars, performers, teachers, and composers living in the city or region of the Society's conference.

From the Program Committee at Large

The Program Committee at large may collectively develop additional program content to enhance the conference program. In doing so, it should consider the unique resources of the city and region in which the conference is being held.


Presentation Formats

All or some of the following formats are included on CMS conference programs:

25-minute Presentations:

Demonstration – A demonstration enables conference attendees to learn about methods, resources, or tools. These differ from workshops in that they are not interactive.

Lecture-Recital – Lecture-recitals present scholarship in combination with a live performance component. Lecture-recitals differ from performances in that they involve a significant amount of speaking.

Paper – A paper is a presentation of research or a significant discovery. It is a spoken presentation but may include audiovisual elements and include time for Q&A.

Performance – A performance is intended to present live music, and speaking is generally limited to brief, introductory comments. A performance program may contain music by one or more composers. Please note: this is not the appropriate venue for featuring the work of CMS composers; rather, composers interested in having their own work performed should respond to the Call for Scores for this conference. Performances are typically 25 minutes in length, although the Program Committee may issue a special call for showcase performances which limits each presentation to 10 minutes.

55-minute Presentations:

Discussion Forum – A forum creates a venue for attendees to interact and discuss specific topics related to the profession. While moderated, most of the information and knowledge sharing is generated by the audience rather than the presenter. Forums are less formal than speaker-led presentations. Forums include a moderator but not multiple presenters.

Panel – Panels provide an opportunity to examine a topic in depth. A panel comprises at least two panelists and is facilitated by a moderator. The moderator may either engage panelists with curated questions or may provide initial remarks before inviting each panelist to share their perspective within a pre-established time frame. Panels might conclude with an audience Q&A session, a summation of key points, and acknowledgements.

Workshop – Workshops enable conference attendees to learn about specific methods, tools, resources, or projects through hands-on interaction, and are generally designed to teach something or develop a specific skill, or set of skills, rather than present original research.

Other Formats:

Campfire Discussion – The goal of 55-minute Campfire Discussions is to inspire an open dialogue in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. Campfire Discussions begin much the same as a traditional presentation, with a speaker at the front of the room sharing a provoking concept or idea to a group of people (think about storytelling around a campfire). After 15 to 20 minutes, however, the focus shifts from the presenter to the audience. For the remainder of the session, the presenter becomes a moderator, inviting responses to comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. Campfire Discussions allow attendees to drive their own learning, listen to multiple perspectives on the same issue, and share experiences with individuals throughout the room. Moderators may offer summative statements at the conclusion. For an effective session, experience with group facilitation is required of moderators.

CMS Talk – CMS Talks are15-minute "TED-like" presentations meant to teach, inspire, engage, and/or motivate the audience, often with supportive visual imagery. CMS Talks are delivered without notes, from memory. The talk should be scripted and structured, not improvised. In addition to conveying facts, these talks should be personal and insightful, with the aim of connecting to the audience. Presenters may use a maximum of 5 slides to support their CMS Talks, and the audience should be able to comprehend each slide in just a few seconds (using a minimal amount of text).

Lightning Talk – Lightning talks are 5-minute presentations focused on a chosen single topic, example, idea, project, or technique. Lightning Talks do not attempt to cover all aspects of their subject matter, but present one facet of the idea clearly and succinctly. In a Lightning Talk, the presenter makes a point and explains it as quickly as possible.

Poster – A poster presents an idea or project via a compelling visual display. Time will be scheduled during the conference for poster presenters to interact with attendees regarding their research.


Special Considerations concerning Plenary Sessions

A plenary session provides the opportunity for all conference attendees to hear a speaker or performer with no other presentations scheduled at the same time.

Why can't my presentation be a plenary session? 

CMS includes plenary sessions on its conference programs to feature special presenters such as the Robert M. Trotter Lecture. These presenters are often invited by the Society to focus on a theme or issue of historic or immediate importance to the music field. Plenary sessions are really quite rare. Reasons for this include the equal sharing of time among and fairness to all conference presenters, as well as practical economics. A one-hour plenary session decreases the number of presenters on the conference program by at least 6 and as many as 20 persons. This increases substantially the average conference cost for all attendees. All conference topics are important to the music field or it is unlikely they would have been accepted by the Program Committee, but to schedule a plenary session is a very special case and rarely possible. Like all conference planning, decisions regarding scheduling plenary sessions are ultimately the responsibility of the Program Committee.

 

Conference Program Content Development

Conference proposals from the sources noted above are considered in light of the highest academic standards and in keeping with the goals of the conference. Generally, time on the program is balanced among the following:

  • the accomplishments and initiatives, broadly defined, of CMS members, both individually and in groups;
  • the needs of the music and higher education community to consider current issues and continuing concerns;
  • the presentation of scholarship, performance, and new music;
  • pedagogy, interdisciplinarity, creative activity, and first-rate scholarship, broadly defined, among and between the music specializations. The Society seeks a balance between disciplinary papers and interdisciplinary sessions;
  • consideration of instructional technologies, methods, pedagogies, and resourcess;
  • work, purposes, and activities of CMS committees;
  • the current initiatives of the Society's books and monograph initiatives;
  • the musics of the city and region in which the conference is being held;
  • community engagement and interaction;
  • other topics and concerns that may emerge from time to time, or that are unique to a conference location.

In light of the above, the Program Committee considers the following in developing the program content:

  • the need for more creative and communal conversations with fewer “talking heads”;
  • presentation of regional music, such as during breaks and receptions, in concert venues, and in the halls.

 

Special Conference Sessions

CMS Conferences include the following two special sessions:

  • The Robert M. Trotter Lecture 
  • CMS-ATMI Technology Lecturer

These sessions are usually plenary and held on different days of the conference. Mission Statements for the above special conference sessions are as follows:

Robert M. Trotter Lecture

In 1994, The College Music Society established the Robert. M. Trotter Lecture to honor the memory of this most distinguished teacher, scholar, and leader in music in American higher education. The purpose of this lecture is to present to the membership of The College Music Society during its annual conference the thinking of a distinguished member of the music profession or related field. The Trotter Lecturer, selected by the Society's Board of Directors, is invited to speak on a subject wide in scope, and generally to reflect upon the concerns of music and higher education, as well as upon the relationship of music and higher education to American culture.

CMS-ATMI Technology Lecturer 

In 1994, the Association for Technology in Music Instruction (ATMI) and The College Music Society (CMS) established the CMS-ATMI Technology Lecture. The purpose of this lecture is to present to the CMS/ATMI national conferences the thinking of a distinguished member of (a) the music and education profession or (b) a relevant and related field. The lecturer, selected by ATMI in consultation with the CMS Board of Directors (procedures will be found here), is invited to speak on a subject wide in scope, to reflect generally upon the technological concerns of music and higher education, and to consider the impact of technology on music, higher education, and American culture.

Optional Special Sessions

From time to time CMS Conferences may also include the following special sessions:

  • Arm-Chair Studio Exchange
  • Master Pedagogy Session
  • Research Papers from Students & Recent Graduates

These sessions are not usually plenary events. Mission Statements for the above special conference sessions are as follows:

Armchair Studio Exchange:
The Armchair Studio Exchange pays tribute to a highly accomplished and influential performer, scholar, composer, educator who offers insights as to music in higher education. Based upon the wisdom of a strong academic career, a short statement for a suggested period of 10 minutes launches an open forum of questions and answers from the host-interviewer and session attendees. The flavor of the forum is somewhat informal and usually includes a stage set of comfortable chairs for the interviewee and host.

Master Pedagogy Session:
The Master Pedagogy Session features a notable “music-teaching master.” This master, selected for his/her reputation as an articulate, colorful, and expressive lecturer, studio teacher, or conductor, includes (a) a 20-minute teaching sampler, (b) a 20-minute reflection upon content, context, process, delivery, and facilitation of learning, and (c) a 20-minute question and answer dialogue with session attendees concerning music, teaching, and learning. The Master Pedagogy session need not necessarily be focused on performance pedagogy.

Research Papers from Students & Recent Graduates:
In an effort to encourage meaningful student participation, this special session pairs invited presenters with faculty mentors (senior researchers) from within the CMS membership. In the months prior to the conference, mentors will reach out to their assigned presenter and help them with their final preparations. Mentors will assist with the format of the paper and offer helpful guidance in terms of topic and paper development. The goal of this session is to give space for all CMS student members to come together and learn from, and with, a select group of researchers as well as to extend the networking web facilitated by CMS. This session is facilitated by the CMS Student Advisory Council, in cooperation with the program committee.

 

CMS Mock Interviews

Under the auspices of the CMS Career Development initiative, The College Music Society provides during its National Conferences opportunities for mock interviews in a confidential setting. All conference registrants, including current students and faculty, are invited to participate.

The following procedures and deadlines are observed:

Announcement of the Mock Interview Opportunity – An announcement of the opportunities to (a) serve as an interviewer or (b) gain experience as an interviewee is released in the spring of each year with the National Conference information.

Interviewers – The following text is used to announce the opportunity to serve as an interviewer:

Serving as an interviewer while meeting with CMS members in a mock interview session can be a tremendously rewarding experience. At CMS National Conferences, the Society always appreciates the participation of those willing to share their expertise and insights whether from the academy or industry. This is an excellent way to gain experience being an interviewer while networking with colleagues and sharing ideas.

In advance of the mock interview, interviewers receive the following in electronic format:

        • interviewee's Vita
        • interviewee's sample cover letter
        • a summary of the interviewee's goals for the mock interview to frame the structure and pace of the interview.

Interview sessions typically consist of at least two interviewers, much like a search committee. Interviewers and interviewees keep all discussions strictly in confidence, adhering to discussion permissible and typical of standard interviews. The interviewers provide whenever possible a variety of expertise and viewpoints for the interviewee.

A form is provided on the CMS website so that conference registrants may sign up to be interviewers.

Interviewees – The following text is used to announce the opportunity to be an interviewee: Interviewees – The following text is used to announce the opportunity to be an interviewee:

Whether you are an experienced faculty member or soon to be a graduate about to apply for your first job, having a mock interview with a panel of professional colleagues unfamiliar with your work can be a very helpful step in securing your next career opportunity. This service is available to all CMS members who register for the conference, and often provides not only a way to gain valuable, live feedback but also a way of networking and sharing ideas with colleagues.

The online registration form requires the following:

        • a sample cover letter
        • a copy of your Vita
        • a summary of the goals you have for the mock interview

These will be shared with your interviewers before your designated meeting time and will help them tailor your session to best suit your needs. All discussions are held in strict confidence by all.

A form is provided on the CMS website so that conference registrants may sign up for interviews.

Process and Deadlines

        • By May 15 of each year — Mock Interview details posted to CMS website
        • By 6 weeks prior to conference — Deadline for interviewers to sign up
        • By 6 weeks prior to conference — Deadline for interviewees to sign up
        • By 1 month prior to conference — Schedule of career sessions is finalized
        • By 2 weeks prior to conference — Schedule notifications sent to all involved personnel

Creation of Mock Interview Sessions

As they are received, applications from both interviewers and interviewees will be provided to the Chair of the Committee on Academic Careers. The Chair, in coordination with Executive Office staff, will create sessions by the posted deadline and will notify all involved of their assigned times and rooms. The Chair will also share the schedule with the Executive Office staff. A schedule will also be available at the registration desk during the National Conference.

 

Career Mentoring Sessions

Under the auspices of the CMS Career Development initiative, The College Music Society provides opportunities for career mentoring sessions during its National Conferences. These sessions give attendees an opportunity to meet with experienced colleagues in order to discuss career issues in a confidential setting. Such issues might include (but are not limited to) position searches, collegial relationships, careers in administration, challenges in leadership positions, tenure and promotion, careers in music business and industry, working at a part-time/non-tenure track job, and academic freedom. All conference registrants, including current students and faculty, are invited to participate.

Career mentoring sessions typically last 40 minutes and are held on Friday and Saturday of the National Conference between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

The following procedures and deadlines are observed:

Announcement of the Career Mentoring Opportunities – An announcement of the opportunities to (a) serve as a mentor or (b) be mentored is released in the spring of each year with the National Conference information.

Mentors – The following text is used to announce the opportunity to serve as a mentor:

Serving as a mentor can be a tremendously rewarding experience. At CMS National Conferences, the Society always appreciates the participation of those willing to share their expertise and insights whether from the academy or industry. This is an excellent way to mentor professional colleagues, network, and share ideas.

Mentoring sessions typically consist of one mentor and one mentee. Mentors and mentees keep all discussions strictly in confidence.

Mentors do the following:

        • Meet with the mentee during a mutually-arranged time
        • Engage the mentee in a discussion addressing their summarized goals for the session
        • Review the mentee’s Vita and sample letter, if appropriate
        • Provide feedback to the mentee

In advance of the mentoring session, mentors receive the following in electronic format:

      • mentee's Vita
      • a summary of the mentee's goals in order to frame the structure and pace of the session.

A form is provided on the CMS website so that conference registrants may sign up to be mentors

Mentees – The following text is used to announce the opportunity to be a mentee:

Having a mentor can be a very helpful whenever professional perspective is needed. This service is available to all CMS members who register for the conference, and often provides not only a way to gain valuable, live feedback but also a way of networking and sharing ideas with colleagues.

The online registration form requires the following:

a) a summary of the goals you have for the mentoring session

b) a copy of your Vita.

These will be shared with your mentor before your designated meeting time and will help them tailor your session to best suit your needs. All discussions are held in strict confidence by all.

A form is provided on the CMS website so that conference registrants may sign up for mentoring sessions

Process and Deadlines

By May 15 of each year — Career mentorship details posted to CMS website

By 6 weeks prior to conference — Deadline for mentors to sign up

By 6 weeks prior to conference — Deadline for mentees to sign up

By 1 month prior to conference — Schedule of career sessions is finalized

By 2 weeks prior to conference — Schedule notifications sent to all involved personnel

Creation of Career Mentoring Sessions

As they are received, applications from both mentor and mentees will be provided to the appropriate Committee Chair (the CMS Committees on Academic Careers, Academic Leadership and Administration, or Careers Outside the Academy). The Chairs will create sessions by the deadline. The final schedule for mentoring sessions is developed by the Chair of the Committee on Academic Careers, who will notify all involved of their assigned times and locations. The Chair will also share the schedule with the Executive Office staff. A schedule will also be available at the registration desk during the National Conference.

 

Programmatic Opportunities within Unique Locations: A Prospectus for the Component of Conferences Devoted to the Study of Local and Regional Musics in America

Introduction

Historically, college, conservatory, and university education in the United States has focused, for the most part, on the rich cultural tradition of western European art music. However, there exists a growing recognition that there are a wide variety of cultural legacies coexisting within North America, and that these shape regional cultural expressions.

It is essential to note the vitality of current interest in the study and performance of the music that springs from these distinct cultural legacies. The Society for American Music, the Center for Black Music Research, the Center for Music of the Americas, the Institute for Studies in American Music, and the Society for Ethnomusicology are examples of the many organizations that share this growing interest in the diverse cultural expressions in North America, and the manner in which they interact or evolve.

The College Music Society has also shown interest in this topic through some of its publications and past efforts within the context of the Annual National and Regional Conferences. Among the publications that explore multicultural issues of cultural diversity and musical expressions of cultural communities in North America are the Monographs and Bibliographies in American Music series; CMS Report No. 3, Racial and Ethnic Directions in American Music; CMS Report No. 8, Toward the End of the Century: Minority and Cross-Cultural Perspectives; and CMS Report No. 7, Music in the Undergraduate Curriculum: A Reassessment.


Description of the Local and Regional Component

Overview

As it has done throughout its history, The College Music Society continues to hold National Conferences in cities in the United States and Canada. As it has since 1984, a component of each National Conference is devoted to the study of local and regional musics of the city and region in which the meeting is held.

The local and regional component of the National Conferences provide members with the opportunity to investigate the diverse American musical expressions, as well as styles of various world cultures whose presence is locally apparent. An attempt is made to explore, detail, and document the nature of the socio-cultural impact which many American historical and international expressions have had on American musical history.

Within the purposes of The College Music Society and its interest in the teaching and learning of music in higher education, members may become better informed about diverse American musics and their contexts. In addition, the Society seeks to utilize historic hotel properties, historic theaters, or other relevant historical sites in support of these efforts.

Taken together, the National Conferences comprise an effort to view the grand sweep of American music history in its multiple manifestations in the United States.

Specific Goals

The specific goals of the Society concerning local and regional American musics are (1) to explore the musical expressions and cultural contexts of the city and region where the meeting is held, including performances by local and regional musicians when possible; (2) to examine these music cultures from the varied musical perspectives of different disciplines (e.g., composition, ethnomusicology/world music, music education, music in general studies, musicology, performance, and theory); (3) to consider pedagogical issues inherent in presenting and teaching these musics; and (4) to survey the relationship of these arts to one another as it has affected local and regional cultural expressions.

Content and Format

The local and regional component of the National Conferences involves not only music, but, when possible, other arts as well. Theater, dance, visual arts, and literature, for example, are explored when they are integral to the musical expressions. Consideration is given to the socio-cultural context of the musics, and documentation of the people's background and history are investigated. Questions of meaning and of relations, including similarities and differences between regional musics, are examined.

Accordingly, each National Conference includes plenary sessions and/or presentations by distinguished musicians, sociologists, anthropologists, and historians which may address the following questions and concerns:

(1) Geographical, Historical, and Socio-Cultural Context

(a) Demography: nature of the populations in the area; experience of specific population segments; relations between peoples; interactions between the various local populations and their musics.

(b) Socio-Cultural Dimensions: ideas about the world and how it works (e.g., belief systems, preferences, material culture of the peoples in the region); characteristics of expressive symbolic systems, motivations, expectations, salient life preferences; effects of interaction with other groups of people.

(2) Regional Music Traditions

(a) Live performances by respected performers from the regions that represent the local traditions.

(b) Additional regional topics: performance traditions; conceptualizations of music; musical materials and practices; compositional techniques; transmission of culture through music; respected carriers of the tradition.

(3) Materials, Resources, and Issues in Teaching and Learning

(a) Considerations of the transmission and teaching of the musical cultures or traditions of the region, focusing on resources, methods, and/or materials; examination of concerns regarding the integration of these musics within the teaching of specific musical disciplines, such as composition, theory, ethnomusicology/world music, historical musicology, music education, music in general studies, etc.

 

Meeting Documentation and Resource Materials

Publications and other resource or documentary materials are made available during and following the National Conference. In addition to published abstracts, the Society may consider the publication of other resources in order to foster further inquiry as well as document the experience provided. These may include bibliographies, critical studies, monographs, recordings, and video presentations.


Conclusion

The study of a diversity of American musics has strong potential for generating a better understanding of many aspects of American history and culture. This component of the National Conference has the potential to foster the integration of experiences, ideas, and materials that can help us better understand who we are, and how we arrived at our present cultural identity. By extension, the experience can help us better understand problematic contemporary issues, both musical and socio-cultural and, perhaps, aid our efforts to develop solutions to them. Finally, the experience can also help us better understand the cultural diversity and richness of North America, and make fuller use of all its potential.


Advertising and Exhibit Options

For the National Conference, the exhibit area is developed for every annual conference. Exhibit opportunities include table-top displays, sponsorship opportunities, and focus groups. The CMS Board of Directors plays an active role in recruiting exhibitors and securing sponsorships.


Registration and Presentation Policies

No-Show Policy

(1) If a proposal is accepted, the presenter agrees to register for the conference and present in person. A presenter may not assign someone else to give their presentation.

(2) If a presenter is unable to attend the conference and present in person, she/he is expected to contact the Program Chair or the CMS Executive Office and withdraw at least 30 days in advance of the conference so that an alternate presentation may be substituted on the program.

(3) If there are extenuating circumstances that prevent the presenter from contacting CMS by the above deadline, it is expected that s/he will still contact the Program Chair or the CMS Executive Office as soon as possible to notify that she/he will be unable to attend the conference.

(4) A presenter who has made no contact with the Program Chair or the CMS Executive Office and does not present in person will be considered a “No Show” and will be prohibited from submitting proposals in the next year to CMS Regional and National conferences, and to the following International Conference.

Conference Registration Policy

Concerning who must register for the conference and pay registration fees, the following policy applies:

All persons who derive professional benefit from attending a CMS conference (1) must hold current membership in CMS and (2) are required to register. This includes anyone whose name appears in the program: all collaborative pianists, composers, panelists, and presenters. Likewise, any presenter who connects to the conference as by electronic means (e.g., Skype) must hold current membership and register for the event. Co-authors of research papers must register for, and attend, the conference for their name to be listed in the program.

Performers on concerts of works by CMS composers are not required to be members or pay registration fees unless these persons plan to attend conference sessions in addition to the one in which they are presenting or performing. In this case, they are expected to pay the registration fee accordingly.

At its discretion, the Program Committee may exempt from the membership and registration fee requirements specific individuals, such as invited speakers or guest panelists who are non-music professionals. It is the responsibility of the individual who submitted the proposal to, upon acceptance, make conference planners aware of all non-music professionals involved in their presentation and to request such an exemption.

Cancellation and Refunds

A deadline for cancellations will be published on the conference website. Refund requests will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Refunds may be offered to persons who have registered for the conference but who are unable to attend due to extenuating circumstances and who have communicated in advance with the Program Chair or CMS Executive Office. Presenters who fail to show for their assigned presentation without contacting the Program Chair or CMS Executive Office are not entitled to a refund. All approved refunds will be issued within one month of the event's conclusion.

 

Past and Future National Conference Sites

1950s

1958 Boston/Cambridge, MA
1959 Chicago, IL

1960s

1960 Berkeley/Stanford, CA
1961 Winston-Salem, NC 
1962 Columbus, OH 
1963 Seattle, WA 
1964 Washington, DC 
1965 Ann Arbor, MI 
1966 New Orleans, LA 
1967 Santa Barbara, CA 
1968 New Haven, CT 
1969 Berea/Cleveland, OH

1970s

1970 Toronto, ON 
1971 San Francisco, CA 
1972 Minneapolis, MN 
1973 Atlanta, GA 
1974 Iowa City, IA 
1975 Rochester, NY 
1976 Washington, DC 
1977 Evanston, IL 
1978 St. Louis, MO 
1979 San Antonio, TX

1980s

1980 Denver, CO 
1981 Cincinnati, OH 
1982 Boston, MA 
1983 Dearborn, MI 
1984 Nashville, TN 
1985 Vancouver, BC 
1986 Miami, FL 
1987 New Orleans, LA 
1988 Santa Fe, NM 
1989 St. Louis, MO

1990s

1990 Washington, DC 
1991 Chicago, IL 
1992 San Diego, CA 
1993 Minneapolis, MN 
1994 Savannah, GA 
1995 Portland, OR 
1996 Atlanta, GA 
1997 Cleveland, OH 
1998 San Juan, PR 
1999 Denver, CO

2000s

2000 Toronto, ON 
2001 Santa Fe, NM 
2002 Kansas City, MO 
2003 Miami, FL 
2004 San Francisco, CA 
2005 Quebec City, Canada 
2006 San Antonio, TX 
2007 Salt Lake City, UT 
2008 Atlanta, GA 
2009 Portland, OR

2010s

2010 Minneapolis, MN 
2011 Richmond, VA 
2012 San Diego, CA 
2013 Cambridge, MA 
2014 St. Louis, MO
2015 Indianapolis, IN
2016 Santa Fe, NM
2017 San Antonio, TX
2018 Vancouver, BC
2019 Louisville, KY

2020s

2020 Miami, FL
2021 Rochester, NY
2022 TBA
2023 TBA
2024 TBA
2025 TBA
2026 TBA
2027 TBA
2028 TBA
2029 TBA